TIRAMISU

Anti-personnel landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXOs) present an important obstacle to the transition from crisis to peace for war-affected countries. They threaten post-conflict development and welfare.

The objective of the TIRAMISU project is to provide the Mine Action community with a toolbox to assist in addressing the many issues related to Humanitarian Demining, thus promoting peace, national and regional security, conflict prevention, social and economic rehabilitation and post-conflict reconstruction.

TIRAMISU tackles the different aspects of Humanitarian Demining through the development of ten modules for end-users.
They are:

  • Advanced General Survey: tools enabling the most heavily mine-infested areas of a region to be prioritised and the efficient use of the other modules in a given situation. 
  • Non-Technical Survey & Advanced General Survey: tools to facilitate land release processes. 
  • Technical Survey: tools to detect indicators of the likely presence of landmines/UXOs. 
  • Stand-off Detection: tools to detect mines, submunitions or explosives at close range with remotely controlled Micro (Unmanned) Aerial Vehicles (MAV/UAV), remotely controlled ground platforms (UGV) or flying biosensors (honeybees). 
  • Ground-based Close-in Detection: tools such as advanced metal detectors, Ground Penetrating Radars and novel chemical sensors. 
  • Disposal of ERW (Explosive Remnants of War): tools to protect deminers or vehicles against explosions. 
  • Mine Risk Education: tools to assist in Mine Risk Education activities. 
  • Training: tools aiming to facilitate capacity building and enable the user uptake of the tools developed. 
  • Mine Action mission management: tools to improve the planning and execution of Mine Action missions. 
  • Standards: this module includes the current and in-progress or proposed CEN Workshop Agreements (CWA). 

In order not only to test the modules, but to also improve the confidence of the Mine Action community in these tools, testing and validation campaigns are organised in several mine-contaminated countries.

European Commission

7th Framework Programme

2012 – 2015

19.5 M€

Haris Balta

Yvan Baudoin 

Project Video Gallery

Final Demonstration
Overview video
Demining during a flood response operation

Project Publications

2020

  • H. Balta, J. Velagic, H. Beglerovic, G. De Cubber, and B. Siciliano, “3D Registration and Integrated Segmentation Framework for Heterogeneous Unmanned Robotic Systems," Remote Sensing, vol. 12, iss. 10, p. 1608, 2020.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF] [DOI]

    The paper proposes a novel framework for registering and segmenting 3D point clouds of large-scale natural terrain and complex environments coming from a multisensor heterogeneous robotics system, consisting of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles. This framework involves data acquisition and pre-processing, 3D heterogeneous registration and integrated multi-sensor based segmentation modules. The first module provides robust and accurate homogeneous registrations of 3D environmental models based on sensors’ measurements acquired from the ground (UGV) and aerial (UAV) robots. For 3D UGV registration, we proposed a novel local minima escape ICP (LME-ICP) method, which is based on the well known iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm extending it by the introduction of our local minima estimation and local minima escape mechanisms. It did not require any prior known pose estimation information acquired from sensing systems like odometry, global positioning system (GPS), or inertial measurement units (IMU). The 3D UAV registration has been performed using the Structure from Motion (SfM) approach. In order to improve and speed up the process of outliers removal for large-scale outdoor environments, we introduced the Fast Cluster Statistical Outlier Removal (FCSOR) method. This method was used to filter out the noise and to downsample the input data, which will spare computational and memory resources for further processing steps. Then, we co-registered a point cloud acquired from a laser ranger (UGV) and a point cloud generated from images (UAV) generated by the SfM method. The 3D heterogeneous module consists of a semi-automated 3D scan registration system, developed with the aim to overcome the shortcomings of the existing fully automated 3D registration approaches. This semi-automated registration system is based on the novel Scale Invariant Registration Method (SIRM). The SIRM provides the initial scaling between two heterogenous point clouds and provides an adaptive mechanism for tuning the mean scale, based on the difference between two consecutive estimated point clouds’ alignment error values. Once aligned, the resulting homogeneous ground-aerial point cloud is further processed by a segmentation module. For this purpose, we have proposed a system for integrated multi-sensor based segmentation of 3D point clouds. This system followed a two steps sequence: ground-object segmentation and color-based region-growing segmentation. The experimental validation of the proposed 3D heterogeneous registration and integrated segmentation framework was performed on large-scale datasets representing unstructured outdoor environments, demonstrating the potential and benefits of the proposed semi-automated 3D registration system in real-world environments.

    @Article{balta20203Dregistration,
    author = {Balta, Haris and Velagic, Jasmin and Beglerovic, Halil and De Cubber, Geert and Siciliano, Bruno},
    journal = {Remote Sensing},
    title = {3D Registration and Integrated Segmentation Framework for Heterogeneous Unmanned Robotic Systems},
    year = {2020},
    month = may,
    number = {10},
    pages = {1608},
    volume = {12},
    abstract = {The paper proposes a novel framework for registering and segmenting 3D point clouds of large-scale natural terrain and complex environments coming from a multisensor heterogeneous robotics system, consisting of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles. This framework involves data acquisition and pre-processing, 3D heterogeneous registration and integrated multi-sensor based segmentation modules. The first module provides robust and accurate homogeneous registrations of 3D environmental models based on sensors’ measurements acquired from the ground (UGV) and aerial (UAV) robots. For 3D UGV registration, we proposed a novel local minima escape ICP (LME-ICP) method, which is based on the well known iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm extending it by the introduction of our local minima estimation and local minima escape mechanisms. It did not require any prior known pose estimation information acquired from sensing systems like odometry, global positioning system (GPS), or inertial measurement units (IMU). The 3D UAV registration has been performed using the Structure from Motion (SfM) approach. In order to improve and speed up the process of outliers removal for large-scale outdoor environments, we introduced the Fast Cluster Statistical Outlier Removal (FCSOR) method. This method was used to filter out the noise and to downsample the input data, which will spare computational and memory resources for further processing steps. Then, we co-registered a point cloud acquired from a laser ranger (UGV) and a point cloud generated from images (UAV) generated by the SfM method. The 3D heterogeneous module consists of a semi-automated 3D scan registration system, developed with the aim to overcome the shortcomings of the existing fully automated 3D registration approaches. This semi-automated registration system is based on the novel Scale Invariant Registration Method (SIRM). The SIRM provides the initial scaling between two heterogenous point clouds and provides an adaptive mechanism for tuning the mean scale, based on the difference between two consecutive estimated point clouds’ alignment error values. Once aligned, the resulting homogeneous ground-aerial point cloud is further processed by a segmentation module. For this purpose, we have proposed a system for integrated multi-sensor based segmentation of 3D point clouds. This system followed a two steps sequence: ground-object segmentation and color-based region-growing segmentation. The experimental validation of the proposed 3D heterogeneous registration and integrated segmentation framework was performed on large-scale datasets representing unstructured outdoor environments, demonstrating the potential and benefits of the proposed semi-automated 3D registration system in real-world environments.},
    doi = {10.3390/rs12101608},
    project = {NRTP,ICARUS,TIRAMISU,MarSur},
    publisher = {MDPI},
    url = {https://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/12/10/1608/pdf},
    }

2018

  • Y. Baudoin, D. Doroftei, G. de Cubber, J. Habumuremyi, H. Balta, and I. Doroftei, “Unmanned Ground and Aerial Robots Supporting Mine Action Activities," Journal of Physics: Conference Series, vol. 1065, iss. 17, p. 172009, 2018.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF] [DOI]

    During the Humanitarian‐demining actions, teleoperation of sensors or multi‐sensor heads can enhance‐detection process by allowing more precise scanning, which is use‐ ful for the optimization of the signal processing algorithms. This chapter summarizes the technologies and experiences developed during 16 years through national and/or European‐funded projects, illustrated by some contributions of our own laboratory, located at the Royal Military Academy of Brussels, focusing on the detection of unexploded devices and the implementation of mobile robotics systems on minefields

    @Article{baudoin2018unmanned,
    author = {Baudoin, Yvan and Doroftei, Daniela and de Cubber, Geert and Habumuremyi, Jean-Claude and Balta, Haris and Doroftei, Ioan},
    journal = {Journal of Physics},
    title = {Unmanned Ground and Aerial Robots Supporting Mine Action Activities},
    year = {2018},
    month = aug,
    number = {17},
    organization = {IOP Publishing},
    pages = {172009},
    publisher = {{IOP} Publishing},
    volume = {1065},
    abstract = {During the Humanitarian‐demining actions, teleoperation of sensors or multi‐sensor heads can enhance‐detection process by allowing more precise scanning, which is use‐ ful for the optimization of the signal processing algorithms. This chapter summarizes the technologies and experiences developed during 16 years through national and/or European‐funded projects, illustrated by some contributions of our own laboratory, located at the Royal Military Academy of Brussels, focusing on the detection of unexploded devices and the implementation of mobile robotics systems on minefields},
    doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/1065/17/172009},
    journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
    project = {TIRAMISU},
    url = {https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1742-6596/1065/17/172009/pdf},
    }

2017

  • Y. Baudoin, D. Doroftei, G. De Cubber, J. Habumuremyi, H. Balta, and I. Doroftei, “Unmanned Ground and Aerial Robots Supporting Mine Action Activities," in Mine Action – The Research Experience of the Royal Military Academy of Belgium, C. Beumier, D. Closson, V. Lacroix, N. Milisavljevic, and Y. Yvinec, Eds., InTech, 2017, vol. 1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF] [DOI]

    During the Humanitarian‐demining actions, teleoperation of sensors or multi‐sensor heads can enhance-detection process by allowing more precise scanning, which is useful for the optimization of the signal processing algorithms. This chapter summarizes the technologies and experiences developed during 16 years through national and/or European‐funded projects, illustrated by some contributions of our own laboratory, located at the Royal Military Academy of Brussels, focusing on the detection of unexploded devices and the implementation of mobile robotics systems on minefields.

    @InBook{baudoin2017unmanned,
    author = {Baudoin, Yvan and Doroftei, Daniela and De Cubber, Geert and Habumuremyi, Jean-Claude and Balta, Haris and Doroftei, Ioan},
    editor = {Beumier, Charles and Closson, Damien and Lacroix, Vincianne and Milisavljevic, Nada and Yvinec, Yann},
    chapter = {Chapter 9},
    publisher = {{InTech}},
    title = {Unmanned Ground and Aerial Robots Supporting Mine Action Activities},
    year = {2017},
    month = aug,
    volume = {1},
    abstract = {During the Humanitarian‐demining actions, teleoperation of sensors or multi‐sensor heads can enhance-detection process by allowing more precise scanning, which is useful for the optimization of the signal processing algorithms. This chapter summarizes the technologies and experiences developed during 16 years through national and/or European‐funded projects, illustrated by some contributions of our own laboratory, located at the Royal Military Academy of Brussels, focusing on the detection of unexploded devices and the implementation of mobile robotics systems on minefields.},
    booktitle = {Mine Action - The Research Experience of the Royal Military Academy of Belgium},
    doi = {10.5772/65783},
    project = {TIRAMISU},
    url = {https://www.intechopen.com/books/mine-action-the-research-experience-of-the-royal-military-academy-of-belgium/unmanned-ground-and-aerial-robots-supporting-mine-action-activities},
    }

  • H. Balta, “Spatial registration of 3D data from aerial and ground-based unmanned robotic systems," PhD Thesis, 2017.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Robotic systems are more and more leaving the protected laboratory environment and entering our daily lives. These robotic entities can come in the form of aerial systems (drones), ground robots or unmanned maritime systems. Each of these robots gathers data about its environment for analysis and reasoning purposes. As more and more robotic systems are deployed, the amount of environmental data gathered by these systems also increases tremendously. This gives rise to a new problem: how to coherently combine the environmental information acquired by different robotic systems into one representation that is both accurate and easy to use by human end-users? In this thesis, we introduce novel methodologies to solve this data fusion problem, by proposing a novel framework for combining heterogeneous 3D data models acquired by different robotic systems, operated in unknown large unstructured outdoor environments into a common homogeneous model. The first proposed novelty of the research work is a fast and robust ground-based 3D map reconstruction methodology for large-scale unstructured outdoor environments. It is based on an enhanced Iterative-Closest- Point algorithm and an iterative error minimization structure, as well as the fast and computational very efficient method for outlier analysis and removal in 3D point clouds. The second proposed novelty of the research work is a registration methodology combining heterogeneous data-sets acquired from unmanned aerial and ground vehicles (UAV and UGV). This is accomplished by introducing a semi-automated 3D registration framework. The framework is capable of coping with an arbitrary scale difference between the point clouds, without any information about their initial position and orientation. Furthermore, it does not require a good initial overlap between the two heterogeneous UGV and UAV point clouds. Our framework strikes an elegant balance between the existing fully automated 3D registration systems (which often fail in the case of heterogeneous data-sets and harsh-outdoor environments) and fully manual registration approaches (which are labour-intensive). A special and defining aspect of this PhD. work was that we did not only focus on investigating scientific and technical innovations but that we also concentrated on bringing these innovations to the terrain in real operational environments in the security context. As an example, we deployed the technological tools developed in the framework of this research work to the field for demining and crisis relief operations in an actual crisis situation. This operational deployment was highly successful, based upon the feedback provided by the end-users.

    @PHDTHESIS {phdbalta,
    author = "Haris Balta",
    title = "Spatial registration of 3D data from aerial and ground-based unmanned robotic systems",
    school = "Royal Military Academy of Belgium",
    year = "2017",
    project={NRTP,ICARUS,TIRAMISU},
    abstract = {Robotic systems are more and more leaving the protected laboratory environment and entering our daily lives. These robotic entities can come in the form of aerial systems (drones), ground robots or unmanned maritime systems. Each of these robots gathers data about its environment for analysis and reasoning purposes. As more and more robotic systems are deployed, the amount of environmental data gathered by these systems also increases tremendously. This gives rise to a new problem: how to coherently combine the environmental information acquired by different robotic systems into one representation that is both accurate and easy to use by human end-users? In this thesis, we introduce novel methodologies to solve this data fusion problem, by proposing a novel framework for combining heterogeneous 3D data models acquired by different robotic systems, operated in unknown large unstructured outdoor environments into a common homogeneous model.
    The first proposed novelty of the research work is a fast and robust ground-based 3D map reconstruction methodology for large-scale unstructured outdoor environments. It is based on an enhanced Iterative-Closest- Point algorithm and an iterative error minimization structure, as well as the fast and computational very efficient method for outlier analysis and removal in 3D point clouds.
    The second proposed novelty of the research work is a registration methodology combining heterogeneous data-sets acquired from unmanned aerial and ground vehicles (UAV and UGV). This is accomplished by introducing a semi-automated 3D registration framework. The framework is capable of coping with an arbitrary scale difference between the point clouds, without any information about their initial position and orientation. Furthermore, it does not require a good initial overlap between the two heterogeneous UGV and UAV point clouds. Our framework strikes an elegant balance between the existing fully automated 3D registration systems (which often fail in the case of heterogeneous data-sets and harsh-outdoor environments) and fully manual registration approaches (which are labour-intensive).
    A special and defining aspect of this PhD. work was that we did not only focus on investigating scientific and technical innovations but that we also concentrated on bringing these innovations to the terrain in real operational environments in the security context. As an example, we deployed the technological tools developed in the framework of this research work to the field for demining and crisis relief operations in an actual crisis situation. This operational deployment was highly successful, based upon the feedback provided by the end-users.},
    }

2015

  • E. Avdic, H. Balta, and T. Ivelja, “UAS deployment and data processing of natural disaster with impact to mine action in B and H, case study: Region Olovo," in International Symposium Mine Action 2015, Biograd, Croatia, 2015, pp. 5-12.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    In this paper, we present a case study report on how novel robotics technologies like the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and data processing methodologies could be used in order to support the traditional mine action procedures and be directly applied onto the terrain while increasing the operational efficiency, supporting mine action workers and minimizing human suffering in case of natural disaster with impact to mine action. Our case study is focusing on the region Olovo (Central Bosnia and Herzegovina) in response to massive flooding, landslides and sediment torrents in spring- summer of 2014. Such destructive impact of the natural disaster on the mine action situation resulted with a re-localizing of many explosive remnants of war which have been moved due to the flooding and landslides with significant negative environmental and security consequences increasing new potentially suspected hazardous areas. What will be elaborated in this paper is the following: problem definition with a statement of needs, data acquisition procedures with UAS, data processing and quality assessment and usability in further mine action procedures.

    @INPROCEEDINGS{balta2015article,
    author={Avdic, Esad and Balta, Haris and Ivelja, Tamara},
    booktitle={International Symposium Mine Action 2015},
    year = {2015},
    address = {Biograd, Croatia},
    pages = {5-12},
    keywords = {Mine Action Support, Unmanned Aerial System, Natural Disaster},
    title = {UAS deployment and data processing of natural disaster with impact to mine action in B and H, case study: Region Olovo},
    keyword = {Mine Action Support, Unmanned Aerial System, Natural Disaster},
    publisher = {HCR-CTRO d.o.o.},
    publisherplace = {Biograd, Hrvatska},
    project={TIRAMISU},
    url={http://mecatron.rma.ac.be/pub/2015/HUDEM_2015_Avdic_Balta_Ivelja_final_ver.pdf},
    abstract= {In this paper, we present a case study report on how novel robotics technologies like the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and data processing methodologies could be used in order to support the traditional mine action procedures and be directly applied onto the terrain while increasing the operational efficiency, supporting mine action workers and minimizing human suffering in case of natural disaster with impact to mine action. Our case study is focusing on the region Olovo (Central Bosnia and Herzegovina) in response to massive flooding, landslides and sediment torrents in spring- summer of 2014. Such destructive impact of the natural disaster on the mine action situation resulted with a re-localizing of many explosive remnants of war which have been moved due to the flooding and landslides with significant negative environmental and security consequences increasing new potentially suspected hazardous areas. What will be elaborated in this paper is the following: problem definition with a statement of needs, data acquisition procedures with UAS, data processing and quality assessment and usability in further mine action procedures.}
    }

2013

  • Y. Baudoin and G. De Cubber, “TIRAMISU-ICARUS: FP7-Projects Challenges for Robotics Systems," in 7th IARP Workshop on Robotics for Risky Environment – Extreme Robotics, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 2013, p. 55–69.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    TIRAMISU: Clearing large civilian areas from anti-personnel landmines and cluster munitions is a difficult problem because of the large diversity of hazardous areas and explosive contamination. A single solution does not exist and many Mine Action actors have called for a toolbox from which they could choose the tools best fit to a given situation. Some have built their own toolboxes, usually specific to their activities, such as clearance. The TIRAMISU project aims at providing the foundation for a global toolbox that will cover the main Mine Action activities, from the survey of large areas to the actual disposal of explosive hazards, including Mine Risk Education. The toolbox produced by the project will provide Mine Action actors with a large set of tools, grouped into thematic modules, which will help them to better perform their job. These tools will have been designed with the help of end-users and validated by them in mine affected countries. ICARUS: Recent dramatic events such as the earthquakes in Haiti and L’Aquila or the flooding in Pakistan have shown that local civil authorities and emergency services have difficulties with adequately managing crises. The result is that these crises lead to major disruption of the whole local society. The goal of ICARUS is to decrease the total cost (both in human lives and in euro) of a major crisis. In order to realise this goal, the ICARUS project proposes to equip first responders with a comprehensive and integrated set of unmanned search and rescue tools, to increase the situational awareness of human crisis managers and to assist search and rescue teams for dealing with the difficult and dangerous, but life-saving task of finding human survivors. As every crisis is different, it is impossible to provide one solution which fits all needs. Therefore, the ICARUS project will concentrate on developing components or building blocks that can be directly used by the crisis managers when arriving on the field. The ICARUS tools consist of assistive unmanned air, ground and sea vehicles, equipped with human detection sensors. The ICARUS unmanned vehicles are intended as the first explorers of the area, as well as in-situ supporters to act as safeguards to human personnel. The unmanned vehicles collaborate as a coordinated team, communicating via ad hoc cognitive radionetworking. To ensure optimal human-robot collaboration, these ICARUS tools are seamlessly integrated into the C4I equipment of the human crisis managers and a set of training and support tools is provided to the human crisis to learn to use the ICARUS system.

    @InProceedings{baudoin2013tiramisu,
    author = {Baudoin, Yvan and De Cubber, Geert},
    booktitle = {7th IARP Workshop on Robotics for Risky Environment - Extreme Robotics},
    title = {{TIRAMISU-ICARUS}: {FP7}-Projects Challenges for Robotics Systems},
    year = {2013},
    pages = {55--69},
    address = {Saint-Petersburg, Russia},
    abstract = {TIRAMISU: Clearing large civilian areas from anti-personnel landmines and cluster munitions is a difficult problem because of the large diversity of hazardous areas and explosive contamination. A single solution does not exist and many Mine Action actors have called for a toolbox from which they could choose the tools best fit to a given situation. Some have built their own toolboxes, usually specific to their activities, such as clearance. The TIRAMISU project aims at providing the foundation for a global toolbox that will cover the main Mine Action activities, from the survey of large areas to the actual disposal of explosive hazards, including Mine Risk Education. The toolbox produced by the project will provide Mine Action actors with a large set of tools, grouped into thematic modules, which will help them to better perform their job. These tools will have been designed with the help of end-users and validated by them in mine affected countries.
    ICARUS: Recent dramatic events such as the earthquakes in Haiti and L’Aquila or the flooding in Pakistan have shown that local civil authorities and emergency services have difficulties with adequately managing crises. The result is that these crises lead to major disruption of the whole local society. The goal of ICARUS is to decrease the total cost (both in human lives and in euro) of a major crisis. In order to realise this goal, the ICARUS project proposes to equip first responders with a comprehensive and integrated set of unmanned search and rescue tools, to increase the situational awareness of human crisis managers and to assist search and rescue teams for dealing with the difficult and dangerous, but life-saving task of finding human survivors. As every crisis is different, it is impossible to provide one solution which fits all needs. Therefore, the ICARUS project will concentrate on developing components or building blocks that can be directly used by the crisis managers when arriving on the field. The ICARUS tools consist of assistive unmanned air, ground and sea vehicles, equipped with human detection sensors. The ICARUS unmanned vehicles are intended as the first explorers of the area, as well as in-situ supporters to act as safeguards to human personnel. The unmanned vehicles collaborate as a coordinated team, communicating via ad hoc cognitive radionetworking. To ensure optimal human-robot collaboration, these ICARUS tools are seamlessly integrated into the C4I equipment of the human crisis managers and a set of training and support tools is provided to the human crisis to learn to use the ICARUS system.},
    project = {ICARUS, TIRAMISU},
    url = {http://mecatron.rma.ac.be/pub/2013/KN Paper YB.pdf},
    }

2012

  • Y. Yvinec, Y. Baudoin, G. De Cubber, M. Armada, L. Marques, J. Desaulniers, and M. Bajic, “TIRAMISU: FP7-Project for an integrated toolbox in Humanitarian Demining," in GICHD Technology Workshop, Geneva, Switzerland, 2012.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The TIRAMISU project aims at providing the foundation for a global toolbox that will cover the main mine action activities, from the survey of large areas to the actual disposal of explosive hazards, including mine risk education and training tools. After a short description of some tools, particular emphasis will be given to the two topics proposed by the GICHD Technology Workshop, namely the methodology adopted by the explosion of an ammunition storage and the possible use of UAV (or UGV/UAV) in Technical survey and/or Close-in-Detection

    @InProceedings{yvinec2012tiramisu01,
    author = {Yvinec, Yann and Baudoin, Yvan and De Cubber, Geert and Armada, Manuel and Marques, Lino and Desaulniers, Jean-Marc and Bajic, Milan},
    booktitle = {GICHD Technology Workshop},
    title = {{TIRAMISU}: {FP7}-Project for an integrated toolbox in Humanitarian Demining},
    year = {2012},
    abstract = {The TIRAMISU project aims at providing the foundation for a global toolbox that will cover the main mine action activities, from the survey of large areas to the actual disposal of explosive hazards, including mine risk education and training tools. After a short description of some tools, particular emphasis will be given to the two topics proposed by the GICHD Technology Workshop, namely the methodology adopted by the explosion of an ammunition storage and the possible use of UAV (or
    UGV/UAV) in Technical survey and/or Close-in-Detection},
    project = {TIRAMISU},
    address = {Geneva, Switzerland},
    url = {http://mecatron.rma.ac.be/pub/2012/TIRAMISU-TWS-GICHD.pdf},
    }

  • Y. Yvinec, Y. Baudoin, G. De Cubber, M. Armada, L. Marques, J. Desaulniers, M. Bajic, E. Cepolina, and M. Zoppi, “TIRAMISU: FP7-Project for an integrated toolbox in Humanitarian Demining , focus on UGV, UAV and technical survey," in 6th IARP Workshop on Risky Interventions and Environmental Surveillance (RISE), Warsaw, Poland, 2012.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The TIRAMISU project aims at providing the foundation for a global toolbox that will cover the main mine action activities, from the survey of large areas to the actual disposal of explosive hazards, including mine risk education and training tools. After a short description of some tools, particular emphasis will be given to the two topics proposed by the GICHD Technology Workshop, namely the methodology adopted by the explosion of an ammunition storage and the possible use of UAV (or UGV/UAV) in Technical survey and/or Close-in-Detection

    @InProceedings{yvinec2012tiramisu02,
    author = {Yvinec, Yann and Baudoin, Yvan and De Cubber, Geert and Armada, Manuel and Marques, Lino and Desaulniers, Jean-Marc and Bajic, Milan and Cepolina, Emanuela and Zoppi, Marco},
    booktitle = {6th IARP Workshop on Risky Interventions and Environmental Surveillance (RISE)},
    title = {{TIRAMISU}: {FP7}-Project for an integrated toolbox in Humanitarian Demining , focus on UGV, UAV and technical survey},
    year = {2012},
    abstract = {The TIRAMISU project aims at providing the foundation for a global toolbox that will cover the main mine action activities, from the survey of large areas to the actual disposal of explosive hazards, including mine risk education and training tools. After a short description of some tools, particular emphasis will be given to the two topics proposed by the GICHD Technology Workshop, namely the methodology adopted by the explosion of an ammunition storage and the possible use of UAV (or
    UGV/UAV) in Technical survey and/or Close-in-Detection},
    address = {Warsaw, Poland},
    project = {TIRAMISU},
    url = {http://mecatron.rma.ac.be/pub/2012/RISE-TIRAMISU.pdf},
    }